Ordering of Sentences
Directions:In the following items each passage consists of six sentences. The first and the sixth sentence are given in the beginning. The middle four sentences in each have been removed and jumbled up. These are labelled P, Q R and S. You are required to find out the proper sequence of the four sentences.

1. S1: I also demand adventure for myself
S6: The satisfaction of adventure is something much more solid than a thrill.

P: As a physiologist I can try experiments on myself
Q: Life without danger would be like life without mustard.
R: Love of adventure does not mean love of thrills.
S: I can also participate in wars and revolutions of which I approve.

2. S1: It is very easy to acquire bad habits.
S6: Even good things should be done from time to time only.

P: If we do not continue to do it, we feel unhappy.
Q: The more we do a thing, the more we tend to - like doing it.
R: The force of habit should be fought against.
S: This is called the force of habit.

3. S1: This year many States have been badly affected by the drought situation prevailing in the country.
S6: Either way, it seems the lot of the Indian farmer to be at the mercy of the elements.

P: No better is the situation elsewhere, where floods have ravaged the standing crop.
Q: Though some have been less affected, even these are facing an uphill task in managing the situation.
R: Especially pitiable is the plight of the poor farmer who cannot offord a tubewell to irrigate his land.
S: Here the predicament is more equitable, for everybody's land is similarly submerged under ten feet of water.

4. S1: We and all other animals breathe in and breathe out air all the time.
S6: It is a part of the earth.

P: If we stop breathing, we die.
Q: It is because of this fact that we are able to live.
R: It is called the atmosphere.
S: All parts of the earth are surTounded by air.

5. S1: The motor car is one of the useful gifts of modern science.
S6: Finally in this age of energy crisis a personal car is an expensive thing.

P: One of these is the smoke and pollution that it creates.
Q: It has made short and medium distance journeys , fast and comfortable.
R: The other is that it has made journey by road hazardous.
S: Yet we can't say that a motor car is a blessing W ithout disadvantages.

6. S1: You live either in a village or a town of India.
S6: India is our motherland.

P: Many villages and towns form a tehsil or a taluka.
Q: There are also some areas in our country called Union Territories.
R: Many tehsils or talukas form a district and many districts form a State.
S: These, together with all the states of our country make India.

7. S1: You know my wife, Madhavi, always urged me to give up smoking".
S6: "Poor,'-girl!"

P: I really gave it up.
Q: And so when I went to jail I said to myself I really must give it up, if for no other reason than of being self - reliant.
R: When I emerged from jail, I wanted to tell her of my great triumph.
S: But when I met her, there she was with a packet of cigarettes.

8. S1: In the eighteenth century people expected most of their children to die before they were grown up.
S6: There is no obvious limit to the improvement of health that cail be brought about by medicine.

P: Improvement began at the beginning of the nineteenth century, chiefly owing to vaccination.
Q: The general death rate in 1948 (10.8) was the lowest ever recorded upto that date.
R: In 1920 the infant mortality in England and Wales was 80 per thousand, in 1948 it was 34 per thousand.
S: It has continued ever since and is still continuing.

9. S1: We must also understand that the fruits of labour are sweeter than the gifts of fortune.
S6: The best life, therefore, is lived both in thought and deed.

P: Moreover, too much of thinking is also a disease.
Q: Indeed, thought and action can be separately analysed but can never be separated from each other.
R: Hence, thought to be complete demands action and action without thought also has no value.
S: It keeps us depressed and gloomy.

10. S1: But Mr. Ford was by no means the inventor of mass production.
S6: When one huge machine began to perform rapidly due operations previously done slowly by hand, the age of mass production was bom.

P: It is difficult, indeed, to say who was.
Q: Brilliant men perfected cotton gins and looms.
R: The inventibn of the steam-engine gave manufacturers the cheap power they needed.
S: When the first large mills for the manufacture of cloth were built, mass production began.

English Test

1. Ordering of Sentences - Test-03
2. Ordering of Sentences - Test-04
3. Ordering of Sentences - Test-05
4. Ordering of Sentences - Test-06
5. Sentence Completion - Test-01
6. Sentence Completion - Test-02
7. Sentence Completion - Test-03
8. Sentence Completion - Test-04
9. Sentence Completion - Test-05
10. Sentence Completion - Test-06
11. General Elementary English Test - 01
12. General Elementary English Test - 02
13. General Elementary English Test - 03
14. General Elementary English Test - 04
15. General Elementary English Test - 05
16. General Elementary English Test - 06
17. General Elementary English Test - 07
18. General Elementary English Test - 08
19. General Elementary English Test - 09
20. General Elementary English Test - 10
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