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Commas Part One

A comma probably has more rules and uses than any other punctuationmark.

Below is an important comma rule.

  • Use commas to separate items (words, phrases, and clauses) in a series.

    James enjoys playing tennis, soccer, and basketball. (words in a series)
    The troop traveled into the mountains, across the plains, and along
    the river. (phrases in a series)

    The car dealer made sure that the purchaserís car was clean, that the
    license plates were ready, and that the ownership papers had been
    signed. (clauses in a series)

    Note: If all the items in a series are joined by and, or, or nor, commas are
    not required.

    The chefís exquisite dishes include filet mignon and roast beef
    and lamb.

    Note: If the conjunction and joins words that constitute a unit, team, or
    such, do not separate that name. Yet, you will still need the commas to
    separate items in a series.

    Peanut butter and jelly, ham and eggs, and spaghetti and meatballs
    are the childrenís favorite foods.

    Note: Some writers choose not to include the final comma in a series if
    by leaving the comma out, the meaning is still clear.

    Our social studies class members studied the Korean War, the Civil
    War, World War I and World War II. (It is clear that the social
    studies students studied four wars.)

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  • the interjection
  • Active and passive voices
  • agreement between indefinite pronouns and their antecedents
  • agreement involving prepositional phrases
  • Commas Part Five
  • Commas Part Four
  • Commas Part One
  • Commas Part Three
  • Commas Part Two
  • complete and simple predicates
  • complete and simple subjects
  • complex sentences
  • compound complex sentences
  • compound prepositions and the preposition adverb question
  • compound subject and compound predicate
  • compound subjects part two
  • compound subjects part one
  • Confusing usage words part eight
  • Confusing usage words part five
  • Confusing usage words part four
  • Confusing usage words part one
  • Confusing usage words part seven
  • Confusing usage words part six
  • Confusing usage words part three
  • Confusing usage words part three 2
  • Confusing usage words part two
  • First Capitalization List
  • indefinite pronouns
  • Indefinite pronouns and the possessive case
  • introducing clauses
  • introducing phrases
  • Irregular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • irregular verbs part one
  • irregular verbs part two
  • Italics Hyphens and Brackets
  • Misplaced and dangling modifiers
  • More Apostrophe Situations
  • More subject verb agreement situations
  • Parentheses Ellipsis Marks and Dashes
  • Periods Question Marks and Exclamation Marks
  • personal pronouns
  • pronouns and their antecedents
  • Quotation Marks Part Three
  • Quotation Marks Part One
  • Quotation Marks Part Two
  • reflexive demonstrative and interrogative pronouns
  • Regular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • regular verb tenses
  • Second Capitalization List
  • sentences fragments and run on sentences
  • singular and plural nouns and pronouns
  • Sound a like words Part Four
  • Sound a like words Part Three
  • Sound a like words Part Two
  • Sound alike words part one
  • subject and verb agreement
  • subject complements predicate nominatives and predicate adjectives
  • subject verb agreement situations
  • the adjective
  • the adjective clause
  • the adjective phrase
  • the adverb
  • the adverb clause
  • the adverb phrase
  • The Apostrophe
  • the appositive
  • The Colon
  • The coordinating conjunction
  • the correlative conjunction
  • the direct object
  • the gerund and gerund phrase
  • the indirect object
  • the infinitive and infinitive phrase
  • The nominative case
  • the noun
  • the noun adjective pronoun question
  • the noun clause
  • the object of the preposition
  • the participle and participial phrase
  • The possessive case
  • The possessive case 2
  • The possessive case and pronouns
  • the preposition
  • the prepositional phrase
  • the pronoun
  • The Semicolon
  • the subordinating conjunction
  • the verb
  • The verb be
  • the verb phrase
  • Transitive and intransitive verbs
  • types of nouns
  • types of sentences by purpose
  • Using Capital Letters
  • what good writers do
  • Precautions while using Electrical Equipment
  • Unhealthy Habits That Will Cost You Dearly
  • Dotnet Interview Q&A
  • Tips to get ready for Long Drive
  • Benefits of Cashew
  • Spookiest Abandoned Places

  • Benefits of Nutmeg

    Potential CancerFighting Benefits

    Nutmeg seeds also house chemicals that might combat cancer growth. One study, published in the Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand in 2007, found that unknown compounds in nutmeg were able to fight the growth of leukemia cells in testtube studies. An additional testtube study, published in the May 2005 issue of Toxicology Letters, found that nutmeg promoted brain cancer cell death.


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