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personal pronouns

A personal pronoun refers to people, places, things, and ideas.

➲ A first-person personal pronoun refers to the one (or ones) speaking.
The singular first-person pronouns are I, me, my, and mine. The plural
first-person personal pronouns are we, our, ours, and us.
We told our story.
I offered my opinion to the reporters.
Ours is the less expensive model.
The new family moved next door to us.
➲ A second-person personal pronoun refers to the one (or ones)
spoken to. The singular and plural second-person personal pronouns
are the same three words—you, your, and yours.
Can you bring your book back here today?
The present will be given to you.
This award is yours.

➲ The third-person personal pronoun is the one (or ones) spoken
about. The singular third-person personal pronouns include he, his,
him, she, her, hers, it, and its. The plural third-person personal pronouns
include they, their, theirs, and them.

He and she wanted to take their children on a vacation.
They asked him and her if the house had kept its appeal.
Do you think that they will think that this car is theirs?

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    INTERCOURSE PENNSYLVANIA

    The town of Cross Keys, nestled in Pennsylvanias Amish country, changed its name to Intercourse in 1814. How and why is anybodys guess. There are a few explanations floating around about the origin of the name, but none with a lot of solid evidence to back them up. One story ties it to a racetrack that used to exist just east of the town. The entrance to the track had a sign above it that read Enter Course. Locals began to refer to the town as Entercourse, which eventually evolved into Intercourse. Another proposed origin has to do with an old usage of the word intercourse


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