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agreement between indefinite pronouns and their antecedents

Singular indefinite pronouns agree in number with their antecedents.
These pronouns are anybody, anyone, anything, each, either, everybody,
everyone, everything, neither, nobody, no one, nothing, one, somebody, someone,
and something.

➲Everyone in the church is singing his or her best. (His and her are singular
pronouns, and everyone is the singular antecedent.)
Note: Use his or her if you assume that both genders are included, as in the
preceding example.

➲ Everything in this large closet has lost its value over the years.
(Its is a singular pronoun that agrees in number with everything, the
singular antecedent.)

Plural indefinite pronouns, including both, few, many, and several, will
serve as plural antecedents.

➲ Both of the singers have their fans. (Both is the plural antecedent, and
their is the plural pronoun.)

➲ Several of the club officials raised their hands with questions. (Several is
the plural antecedent, and their is the plural pronoun.)

Some pronouns can be either singular or plural, depending upon
their context within the sentence. These pronouns are all, any, more, most,
none, and some.

In these instances, look to see if the object of the preposition is singular or
plural. The verb and antecedent will agree with the object of the preposition.

➲ All of the newspaper is wet, and I cannot read it now. (Newspaper, the
object of the preposition, is singular; use the singular pronoun, it.)

➲ Most of the newspapers have raised their advertising prices. (Newspapers,
the object of the preposition, is plural; use the plural pronoun, their.)

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  • Guru Nanak Dev

    Teachings

    Guru Nanaks teachings can be found in the Sikh scripture Guru Granth Sahib, as a vast collection of revelatory verses recorded in Gurmukhi.From these some common principles seem discernible. Firstly a supreme Godhead who although incomprehensible, manifests in all major religions, the Singular Doer and formless. It is described as the indestructible (undying) form.Nanak describes the dangers of egotism (haumai I am) and calls upon devotees to engage in worship through the word of God. Naam, implies God, the Reality, mystical word or formula to recite or meditate upon (shabad in Gurbani), divine order (hukam) and at places divine teacher (guru) and gurus instructions) and singing of Gods qualities, discarding doubt in the process. However, such worship must be selfless (sewa). The word of God, cleanses the individual to make such worship possible. This is related to the revelation that God is the Doer and without God there is no other. Nanak warned against hypocrisy and falsehood saying that these are pervasive in humanity and that religious actions can also be in vain. It may also be said that ascetic practices are disfavoured by Nanak, who suggests remaining inwardly detached whilst living as a householder.


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